logo-elpub2016PrintLIBER ELPUB 2016 Preconference Workshop

“Opening up the collection – reuse and publishing”

International Conference on Electronic Publishing 2016

Preconference day – LIBER Workshop : 7 June 2016
Conference days : 7-9 June 2016 in Göttingen, Germany

Venue : Convention Centre “Alte Mensa”

The LIBER Working Group „Digital Collections“, the DFG-Project “Future Publications in the Humanities” and DARIAH-EU organise the workshop “Opening up the collection – reuse and publishing” at the ELPUB Conference 2016 on the reuse and dissemination aspects within the life cycle of complex digital collections serving as sources for scientific use.

The workshop aims to bring citizen scientists, researchers, publishing initiatives and collection experts together, discussing the organisational, socio-economic and technical aspects of the reuse scenarios “dissemination and publication” of complex digital collections.

When it comes to collections, scientific use should be defined in a broad sense as “systematic and rationale-oriented interaction leading to reusable results”. It thus comprises scholarly research within a disciplinary framework or across disciplines such as Digital Humanities and crowd-sourced science or Citizen Science.
Collections with a potential for scientific use are usually curated at national or research libraries, archives or museums and consist of different objects from the realm of cultural heritage (images, texts, artefacts etc.) as well as cultural records such as mass media objects or scholarly publications.
What they have in common is their nature as being available in digital format, either as retro-digitised or born digital objects and their potential to be analysed, processed and represented in new formats freed from most physical constraints.

Opening up those collections for scientific use and the respective dissemination and publishing in new digital contexts, we see five fields that call for discussion:
(a) standards, object definition and data modelling,
(b) ownership and responsibility over time,
(c) presentation and access,
(d) enriching collections by user-generated content and finally
(e) publishing formats and publishing entities.

Contact: Prof. Dr. Andreas Degkwitz – Mrs. Margo Bargheer

Digitization of copyright protected newspapers in European libraries

Workshop Report of the LIBER Working Group “Digitial Collections” on the LIBER Conference 2015 in London : links to the survey and articles Denmark, France, Norway, Sweden) are provided here below.

Andreas Degkwitz – Humboldt University Berlin

The responsibility for large digital collections forces research libraries to adapt in respect to strategy and organization, allocating financial and technological resources, and developing competencies and skills. Against the backdrop of current LIBER activities the working group will focus on the issue of digital collections to support LIBER members in selecting appropriate strategies. The working group will collect, analyse and communicate best practices and project activities to highlight the importance of digital collections for open science and scholarly communication.

LIBERs working group “Digital Collections” has decided to host a workshop about the digitization of copyright protected newspapers in European libraries on the LIBER conference in London 2015. The Europeana newspaper project demonstrated the many activities of digitization in European libraries. Recent developments in countries like Finland, Denmark and Norway are aiming at large scale digitization and at securing access to collections of current and copyright protected newspapers. From that background the working group started a survey about this topic, which has been done by the National Library of Norway, in order to explore the actual situation in Europe. The results of the survey and the findings of best practice examples have been presented on the workshop “Digitization of copyright protected newspapers in European libraries” on the LIBER conference 2015 in London.

Thereby the following questions have been focused:
• Usage of the digitized newspapers
• Legal framework and copyright regulations
• Enabling research e. g. via TDM facilities
• Access for a wider public, national responsibility
• Conflicting interests (economical, privacy, public, rights holder etc.)
• What is “a good enough quality”? Which formats?
• Tasks of the libraries

The speaker of the workshop focused these and further topics in their presentations, which are summarized here:

  • Roger Jøsevold (National Library of Norway): Results of the Survey – Copyright protected newspaper digitization in Europe – Link to the article
  • Tonny Skovgard Jensen (State and University Library in Aarhus): Digitization of copyright protected newspapers in Denmark– Link to the article
  • Bruno Sagna (Bibliothèque Nationale de France): Digitization of copyright protected newspapers in France – Link to the article
  • Roger Jøsevold (National Library of Norway): Digitization of copyright protected newspapers in Norway – Link to the article
  • Torsten Johansson (Royal Library of Sweden): Digitization of copyright protected newspapers in Sweden – Link to the article

Research libraries take responsibility for the entire lifecycle of digital collections enabling widest dissemination and use, at present and for the future.

Publishing, managing and preserving digital collections is a challenge for every research library. Image by Nicola / CC-BY.

Providing, managing and preserving digital collections is a challenge for every research library. Image by Nicola / CC-BY.

The growing digitisation of scholarly communication is closely connected with the comprehension of the concept of collection, collection development and collection management. The current practice of acquiring e-books and e-journals as licensed resources poses a number of new challenges. Mass-digitization programs to make cultural heritage available result in large digital collections that call for new technical and organisational perspectives. Several research libraries have taken on the responsibility of providing their researchers with publishing opportunities and publishing support. These manifold activities result in questions the working group aims to tackle:

  • How do we understand collection and collection development in the digital age? What is the role of the research library, now and in the future?
  • Which digital items are considered as components of the digital collections: e-books, e-journals, multi-media material, born-digital items such as open access publications or software code, research data, and digitized materials?
  • What are the tasks and requirements that libraries have to meet in order to provide and to maintain digital collections? What partnerships, skills and competencies are required?
  • What are the benefits of digital collections for researchers and the advancement of science, for teaching purposes and the general public? What are the most effective ways of exposing digital collections of different types to these different audiences?

The responsibility for large digital collections forces research libraries to adapt in respect to strategy and organisation, allocating financial and technological resources, and developing competencies and skills. Against the backdrop of current LIBER activities the working group will focus on the issue of digital collections to support LIBER members in selecting appropriate strategies.

The working group will collect, analyse and communicate best practices and project activities to highlight the importance of digital collections for open science and scholarly communication.

Working Group Members